Bridging the Gap’s Internship Program

Bridging the Gap pic

Bridging the Gap
Image: med.upenn.edu

A pioneer in the healthcare investment business, Dr. Mitchell Blutt founded Consonance Capital in 2005 and leads the firm as chief executive officer. Mitchell Blutt began his medical career by earning his doctor of medicine from the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, which participates in community outreach through the Bridging the Gaps program.

Founded in 1991, the Bridging the Gaps (BTG) program draws students from a diverse array of disciplines attending the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Drexel University, Temple University, and Thomas Jefferson University. One of the main components of the program is the Community Health Internship Program (BTG CHIP).

Through the BTG CHIP Program, students engage in a paid summer internship through which they gain insight into the complex factors that impact the health of individuals in economically disadvantaged communities. Additionally, the program gives students a unique opportunity to collaborate across disciplines.

The BTG CHIP Program places students in some 100 nonprofit organizations in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Students work in teams alongside site staff members and faculty to create projects that both meet the needs of community members and further students’ knowledge in their areas of academic interest. To learn more about the BTG CHIP program, visit http://www.med.upenn.edu/btg.

Commonwealth Fund Hosts Health Care Delivery System Reform Program

Over the course of more than a decade, Dr. Mitchell Blutt has divided his time between his responsibilities as the chief executive officer of Consonance Capital and as a clinical assistant professor of medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College. Outside of his professional endeavors, Dr. Mitchell Blutt leverages his experience in the health care field to serve on the board of directors of The Commonwealth Fund.

Since its inception nearly a century ago, The Commonwealth Fund has upheld the mission of improving the American health care system so that it can better support those most in need. In addition to providing medical grants to outside entities, the fund hosts a number of programs focused on specific health care topics.

One such initiative, known as the Health Care Delivery System Reform program, takes a closer look at the most vulnerable patient communities in the United States and the issues that they face related to health care delivery. Overall, there are two primary groups that fall under this category: those with serious conditions, which may include functional limitations that make daily life difficult, and those who with low incomes who likely do not have health insurance.

The Commonwealth Fund’s reform program aims to make quality care more accessible to both of these parties in a number of ways. The first of these focuses on improving and changing the policies that surround the current health care delivery system. Supporting these efforts, the program also researches any health care operations and models that can improve treatment for all. Chiefly, the Commonwealth Fund is dedicated to studying these two patient communities so that it may facilitate better care for both of them.

Get Creative for a Cure

Michael J. Fox Foundation pic

Michael J. Fox Foundation
Image: michaeljfox.org

Mitchell Blutt, MD, is a physician and businessman. As one of the first physicians in the professional healthcare investment business, and a professor at Weill Cornell Medical College, Mitchell Blutt is recognized as a pioneer in his field, and also spends his time outside of work supporting numerous charitable organizations, including formerly sitting on the board of the Michael J. Fox foundation.

The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving therapies and finding a cure for Parkinson’s disease. The organization focuses on raising and providing funds for the research required to accomplish this goal, as well as creating awareness of the disease and of clinical trials for volunteers to participate in.

The Michael J. Fox Foundation has a multitude of official fundraising options and events, many athletically-geared, such as creating a team on the the annual Rock ‘N Roll DC Marathon, but the bulk of their events come through community-raised efforts. The foundation has a site specifically for those who wish to create their own event for their community, as well as ideas for the event itself, such as pancake nights, galas, cycling competitions, and more. However, participants are usually even more creative with their ideas: past events include a food fight in Chicago, a wine tasting event in Phoenix, a Kid’s Filming Festival in Cleveland, and more. To create your own event, visit michaeljfox.org.

Michael J. Fox Foundation Sets Fundraising Records in 2015

Michael J. Fox Foundation pic

Michael J. Fox Foundation
Image: michaeljfox.org

As founder and chief executive officer of Consonance Capital in New York City, Dr. Mitchell Blutt oversees the daily operations of the healthcare investment firm. A philanthropic individual, Dr. Mitchell Blutt supports several nonprofit organizations and was on the board of directors for the Michael J. Fox Foundation.

Established in 2000 by actor Michael J. Fox, the Michael J. Fox Foundation seeks to find a cure for Parkinson’s Disease through research and therapeutic trials. Since its inception, the nonprofit organization has raised more than $450 million for research.

To raise money, the foundation sponsors numerous events throughout the country. In January 2016, the organization announced it broke fundraising records during 2015. It raised more than $11.5 million, with 100 percent of the amount going directly toward research efforts. In 2015, the foundation achieved the following fundraising milestones:

The highest monetary amount raised by one individual was $849,473. Andrew Creighton, who lives with Parkinson’s disease, ran the New York City Marathon for the first time in November and raised this amount.

The eighth-annual New England Parkinson’s Ride raised $546,426, making the list of top 2015 fundraising events for the year.

The number of members who fundraised in 2015 was 3,320, with 537 hosting a create-your-own event. In addition, 562 people ran, biked, and swam at one of the organization’s 15 sponsored athletic events.